Single/Multi Camera Adventures in First Year Media Production

The winter semester of my first year in Media Production has been the funnest few months of my entire existence (not exaggerating). After some introductory courses in Digital Media, Creative Processes, and Sound Production last semester, we finally got the opportunity to try our hand at making videos – which I’ve realized is my most favourite thing to do ever. What I love especially is that single camera and multi camera (two separate types of video) are split into two six week courses which allowed us to try twice as many things in a short period of time. So, I thought I’d share what it’s like to have a six week crash course in one area of television then switch over to doing something completely new (which I’ve just started), and what you can expect from working in groups on these types of projects!

If you’re wondering what single and multi is referring to, it’s basically two completely different types of video.

Single-camera: where we make short films and videos on location, also known as EFP (electronic field production)

Multi-camera (uses 3 cameras): where we create studio productions like the news, game shows, talk shows, sitcoms, etc.

At first, it was pretty daunting to have to navigate equipment I’d never even laid eyes on before, like this…

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this…

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and this…

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But after we got all straightened out on the technical aspect, all that was left to do was have a blast trying a ton of crazy stuff. We filmed a total of 3 videos in the single camera first half of the course, and got to create some really cool videos…

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Overall, the best part of single camera is just being able to make stuff with other people, seeing how your ideas mesh, bouncing thoughts off of each other, building stories together, and have the most fun in the process…

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Collaboration isn’t only something I enjoy personally, but is also a huge part of any program at Ryerson. We’re constantly getting the chance to work creatively with others and develop those collaborative skills early on, which is crucial for our future careers.

Although we’ve just started producing a talk show in my first few weeks in multi-camera, the group work is just as important (if not more) for pulling together a live show in our final project. I can’t wait to see which fun new adventures I’ll be having with brand new people!

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