How to Navigate Group Work

No matter what program you’re in at Ryerson, you will most likely find yourself having to work with many different kinds of people during your years of study. Whether it’s a large project, small assignment, or just a group study session, working with others can often be a tricky task, but can also lead to an exceptional final product.

Group work is a vital part of the Creative Industries program and in the career field especially, so I’ve already worked on several group projects for each class. I’ll offer some basic guidelines on the most effective ways of organizing your group and getting along with your partners in order to produce the best work possible and avoid any major conflicts.

  1. Set a meeting date to discuss the assignment – this is essential to the success of your project but may be difficult to organize according to each members conflicting schedules. Everyone must to be present to contribute the appropriate amount at this stage. In this preliminary meeting, the logistics of the project can be sorted out and the group can also find the best approach to accomplishing the work.
  2. Be open to other people’s ideas – it’s necessary to have an open mind during the brainstorming process and be willing to compromise your own ideas to fit with the rest of the group’s. Everyone should have an opportunity to lend their unique skill sets and abilities to producing the final product.
  3. Separate the work – It may be beneficial to divide the responsibilities among group members so that each person can work individually and on their own time. This way, everyone can contribute equally and the project will be finished in a shorter amount of time.

While facing the challenge of working in groups, it’s important to remember that our ability to collaborate with one another is one of the most crucial aspects of learning. Be sure to look to your group members for support, ask questions, and get the most you can out of the experience!

 

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